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A Flock of Cedar Waxwings

 

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During the past couple of days we have been seeing a big flock of Cedar Waxwings here in our neighborhood.  It is likely that there are several hundred birds in the flock.  These birds slightly resemble the Tufted Titmice in that they have a top-knot but they are larger, are a rosy beige with yellow, white and black markings. They Cedar Waxwings also have the appearance of a faint smokey-black eye mask.  I really like these cuties!

The Cedar Waxwings like eating berries (such as the Juniper berries seen in some of these photographs) and small nuts.  They also eat insects but generally are seed-eaters.  They can sometimes become drunk from eating fermenting berries!  What a thing!  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger photo.  Enjoy!

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Comments on: "A Flock of Cedar Waxwings" (4)

  1. Haven’t seen any here for awhile. I remember from childhood, large flocks of them would come up here toward the very end ofwinter and I loved their colors.

    • Hi Montucky, These are the first I have seen here in my new area but this is the first Winter season I have lived in this neighborhood. I moved slightly SE last July. My new area is a true bird watcher’s paradise! Glad you have had the pleasure of seeing the Cedar Waxwings! Have a tremendously nice weekend! Enjoy your snow and scenic views!

  2. i love spotting them! they come thru so briefly here, i often miss them.

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