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Wood Storks

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This group of Wood Storks was here in December but several are still around the area.  The Wood Storks are genuinely odd-looking sweet big birds!  I love seeing them here.

Wood Storks roost in trees but wade in shallow water to hunt for crustaceans, aquatic snails, larger aquatic insects, small fish, shore-side large land insects, and worms.  The Wood Storks also eat grains and plants on occasion.

Mostly the Wood Storks just stand around.  That seems to really be the case.  Wood Storks are very passive calmer birds and that helps make them easy to photograph.  I sometimes wonder what they are thinking and doing?  Fascinating birds.  By the way, the younger birds have lighter-colored pink feet (Wood Storks of all ages do have pink feet) and lighter-colored bills.  I have read that Wood Storks may fly some fifty miles from their own roost area to find enough food.  That seems amazing!  They sure are good at flying!  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

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Comments on: "Wood Storks" (4)

  1. They are odd-looking, especially with their pink feet. I wonder shat that strategy is.

  2. Hello, they have that ugly-cute thing going on. Great photos of the Wood Storks. Happy Monday, enjoy your new week!

    • Hi Eileen, Yes, you are absolutely right about how they are so ugly they are cute. I like Wood Storks a lot. I really do wonder what they think of us as they are often close to people here. Have a great week!

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