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Posts tagged ‘Nature’

Nearly Wordless Wednesday: A Bunny

This Cotton-tailed Rabbit visited on Monday at about twilight.  Unfortunately I had to take the picture through the closed living room and lanai windows, each screened.  I did not want to go out which would chase the bunny away.  This was a very brief and pretty rare appearance of the rabbit.  Please click on the image to see the slightly enlarged version.  Enjoy!

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A Few Pictures of Osprey Hawks

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of that photo.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes are found here in The Villages, FL, in several spots all year long.  We have a native Southern Sandhill Crane population that mostly stays on or near golf courses or park areas near ponds.  These large birds eat grasses, seeds, insects, aquatic plants, aquatic snails, and occasionally small fish or frogs.

We usually see the Sandhill Cranes in pairs or family units with parents and one or two offspring, called “Colts”.  When traveling, the cranes will flock up and sometimes we will see ten or even twenty of the cranes here along the shore of our small lakes.  I am always thrilled to see the Sandhill Cranes!  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of that photo.  Enjoy!

Wordless Wednesday: Canada Geese

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

Bald Eagles for Memorial Day

In memory of those who died in the service of the country.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.

Wordless Wednesday: White and Glossy Ibises

Adult White Ibis

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

Adult White Ibis

Glossy Ibis

Juvenile and Adult White Ibis

Anhingas and Cormorants

Double-crested Cormorant

Anhinga birds and Double-crested Cormorants are very similar aquatic birds.  The differences are the bill and body size with only faint differences about the feathers.  The Anhingas are more slender and have a very straight slender sword-like bill.  The female Anhinga is more brown in color with a light tan throat.  These females are also nicknamed “Piano birds” for the pattern of their feathers.

The Double-crested Cormorants can be distinguished by the slightly hooked tip of their long also sword-like bill.  The cormorants also are much heftier and blocky in body than the Anhingas.  Both eat fish, frogs, and small turtles.  Both are experts in flight as well as swimming.  Both the Anhingas and Double-crested Cormorants are referred to as “Snake birds” as they come up from diving with only their long sinuous neck and their head peeking out of the water.

The Anhingas are here all year long but the cormorants mostly are migratory with the White Pelicans.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

Anhinga

Anhinga

Double-crested Cormorants

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