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Posts tagged ‘outdoors thumbnail images’

Wordless Wednesday: Little Blue Herons

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

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A Few Pictures of Osprey Hawks

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of that photo.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes are found here in The Villages, FL, in several spots all year long.  We have a native Southern Sandhill Crane population that mostly stays on or near golf courses or park areas near ponds.  These large birds eat grasses, seeds, insects, aquatic plants, aquatic snails, and occasionally small fish or frogs.

We usually see the Sandhill Cranes in pairs or family units with parents and one or two offspring, called “Colts”.  When traveling, the cranes will flock up and sometimes we will see ten or even twenty of the cranes here along the shore of our small lakes.  I am always thrilled to see the Sandhill Cranes!  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of that photo.  Enjoy!

American Robins, and a Northern Cardinal

For almost wordless Wednesday, I will share some photographs I took this past week in Iowa.  I hope you will enjoy them.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.

Anhingas and Cormorants

Double-crested Cormorant

Anhinga birds and Double-crested Cormorants are very similar aquatic birds.  The differences are the bill and body size with only faint differences about the feathers.  The Anhingas are more slender and have a very straight slender sword-like bill.  The female Anhinga is more brown in color with a light tan throat.  These females are also nicknamed “Piano birds” for the pattern of their feathers.

The Double-crested Cormorants can be distinguished by the slightly hooked tip of their long also sword-like bill.  The cormorants also are much heftier and blocky in body than the Anhingas.  Both eat fish, frogs, and small turtles.  Both are experts in flight as well as swimming.  Both the Anhingas and Double-crested Cormorants are referred to as “Snake birds” as they come up from diving with only their long sinuous neck and their head peeking out of the water.

The Anhingas are here all year long but the cormorants mostly are migratory with the White Pelicans.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

Anhinga

Anhinga

Double-crested Cormorants

A Few Great Egrets

The Great Egrets here in Florida are the larger of the egrets.  These are lovely white birds that have a golden yellow sharp large bill and black legs and feet.  In the breeding season of late Winter, the Great Egrets develop long lacy feathers.  The Great Egrets are wading birds that stroll in the shallows of ponds, lakes, marshes and rivers to find shellfish, fish, frogs, larger insects and turtles.  These birds also will take to land and patrol the landscaped areas for mice, lizards and snakes to eat.

Great Egrets also are great at flying and sometimes will flock together to migrate.  We do have a year around population here but have a considerable number of birds come for the Winter.  Wishing all the ladies a very happy Mother’s Day on Sunday.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

 

Bald Eagles Repairing Their Nest in The Villages, FL

This pair of Southern Bald Eagles has nested and raised two families this year alone.  The pair have their nest on an electric tower in the center of the lovely Nancy Lopez Legacy Golf Course here in The Villages, Florida.  This area is accessible via golf cart on the multi-modal path.

It appears the couple is repairing or remodeling their nest.  Perhaps they are trying to ready their nest for a new clutch of eggs?  Who knows?  This nest is close to several ponds and open fields so food is plentiful.  There also are larger trees and electric towers for the high perches eagles seem to prefer.  A good habitat for raising eaglets!  By the way, I took these pictures at about 6:00pm on Friday evening, May 3, 2019.   Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

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