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Posts tagged ‘storks’

Wood Storks (Up Close)

Wood Storks have been spotted here in The Villages at Glenwood Country Club pond, at Freedom Pointe Lake, and at Lake Mira-mar.  The two I saw at Lake Mira-mar were quite curious and came up close to me when I shot the photo from the golf cart (hence the close-ups).  I think tourists are still feeding the White Ibis and Wood Storks at Lake Mira-mar which is at Spanish Springs which is why the storks have lost fear of people and beg.  Sad.  Yes there is a sign telling people not to feed the birds but some still do so.  I do not.

The other lakes I mention, had Wood Storks that decidedly were not going to be near people at all.  Very wild and good.  Wood Storks stop by in the late Winter and again in about July.  Occasionally the Wood Storks are here at other times but not as many individual birds.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

 

Wordless Wednesday: Wood Storks

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

Quite a Few Wood Storks Visiting

Wood Storks are among my very favorite of the big birds.  There are a lot of Wood Storks around the various ponds and lakes here in The Villages, FL, right now.  They seem to come several times every year to feed and enjoy our lovely small lakes.

Wood Storks are still on the “Threatened Species” list so I am glad to see so many here.  I think due to conservation efforts these birds are happily on the rebound!  Wood Storks mostly feed on small fish, tadpoles and small frogs, as well as aquatic worms, snails and occasionally, grains and seeds.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

A Huge Flock of Wood Storks!

Wood Storks occasionally visit The Villages, FL but usually we see maybe six or seven in one spot.  This morning I saw sixty Wood Storks, many of them juveniles, at the El Santiago Golf Course pond on the El Camino Avenue end near the multi-modal path.

I think that due to the recent tropical storm to the NW of us on the coast, this flock has migrated.  We are fortunate to have seen the whole group together.  By the way, the juveniles have the fuzzy head and nearly ivory-white bills.  Wood storks begin to have a large ivory-white bony plate on their head (no feathers or fuzz) and have a darker bill as they age.

I also saw an adult Wood Stork trying to eat a very large catfish that it caught in its huge bill.  The effort did briefly attract the attention of a Great Blue Heron, but the heron got the message that it would not be able to steal the fish away!  The flock was at the pond in four separate groupings so I tried to represent some of each group with these pictures.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of each photo.  Enjoy!

 

 

Wordless Wednesday: Wood Storks

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

 

Wordless Fri.: Flying Waders

Juvenile White Ibis

Great Egret

Snowy Egret

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

Great Egret

Tri-colored Heron

Wood Stork

 

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

Wood Stork

Wood Storks at Lake Mira-Mar in The Villages

This pair of Wood Storks was spotted last Thursday afternoon on the park shore-line of little Lake Mira-mar in The Villages, FL at Spanish Springs.  The storks were just hanging out along with a mob of White Ibis and several Mottled Ducks and Black-bellied Whistling Ducks.

The Wood Storks are here several times a year and this spot seems to be a favorite of theirs.  One Wood Stork was up near the parking lot and the other was close to the little dock area.  I always enjoy seeing these serene big exotic wading birds!  I believe the one closest to the parking area is an older stork.  The Wood Storks live about 12 years or so.  Their head gets covered with hard bony like growths and their bill gets darker as they age.  Always a treat to see the Wood Storks!  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

 

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