Just another WordPress.com weblog about Nature and Wildlife

Posts tagged ‘storks’

Wordless Friday: Flight

Seagulls

Seagulls

Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

Glossy Ibis

Glossy Ibis

Wood Stork

Wood Stork

Osprey

Osprey

 

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes

Belted Kingfisher

Belted Kingfisher

White Pelican

White Pelican

 

 

 

Wood Storks

dsc_1136

This group of Wood Storks was here in December but several are still around the area.  The Wood Storks are genuinely odd-looking sweet big birds!  I love seeing them here.

Wood Storks roost in trees but wade in shallow water to hunt for crustaceans, aquatic snails, larger aquatic insects, small fish, shore-side large land insects, and worms.  The Wood Storks also eat grains and plants on occasion.

Mostly the Wood Storks just stand around.  That seems to really be the case.  Wood Storks are very passive calmer birds and that helps make them easy to photograph.  I sometimes wonder what they are thinking and doing?  Fascinating birds.  By the way, the younger birds have lighter-colored pink feet (Wood Storks of all ages do have pink feet) and lighter-colored bills.  I have read that Wood Storks may fly some fifty miles from their own roost area to find enough food.  That seems amazing!  They sure are good at flying!  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

dsc_1172dsc_1209dsc_1197

A Flock of Wood Storks Visits

dsc_1168

These Wood Storks were visiting our neighborhood park lake this past week.  We recently had some needed rain so our lake has risen a little since I took these pictures on Dec. 4, 2016.  I took the pictures at Schwartz Park here in The Villages, FL on Lake Paradise.  The birds were standing in mere inches of water in the middle of the lake!  I think the fishing was good.  There also were White Pelicans, Great Egrets, and a lot of ducks!  Please click on the thumbnail image to view a slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

dsc_1154dsc_1159dsc_1212-1

 

Wood Stork Wednesday

dsc_0874

This migratory flock of Wood Storks was seen on Nov. 17, 2016 at the small lake right behind Freedom Pointe assisted living facilities on El Camino in The Villages, FL.  The placid storks were among a throng of egrets, herons, ducks, geese and cormorants at the two side by side little lakes.

The Wood Storks are a threatened species that has been known to fly as far as fifty miles from its nest in search of foods like:  aquatic worms, snails, small fish, small turtles, frogs and fish or frog eggs.

The Wood Storks are so calm and enjoyable to watch.  They seem to be curious about people but are unfazed when people are in their vicinity.  They are not “Tame” but are wild exotic birds.  It is very important that people to not feed Wood Storks as it will cause them to become dependent on people’s hand-outs and then the birds will not hunt naturally as much (and the handouts may prove unhealthy for their system).  Another thing is that it is against Florida law to feed exotic birds.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

Wishing everyone a very happy Thanksgiving!

dsc_0847dsc_0841

A Wood Stork With Lots of Company

Great Blue Heron & Wood Stork

Great Blue Heron & Wood Stork

This Wood Stork was strolling around the shore of the Santiago golf course pond in The Villages, Florida, a few days ago with several other wading and shorebirds.  Amazingly, a Bald Eagle overlooked the scene.  I am thrilled to see the Wood Stork as it has been several months since I last spotted any Wood Storks here in The Villages.

The Wood Stork uses its large thick bill to scoop through the mud for bits of worms, snails, insects, aquatic plants and pretty much any small aquatic animals to eat.  I just love seeing these endangered species list big birds!  I think they are so serene and unique.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the slightly larger version of the photo.  Enjoy!

Wood Stork

Wood Stork

Wood Stork & Glossy Ibis

Wood Stork & Glossy Ibis

Wood Stork

Wood Stork

 

Waterfowl, Wading Birds, and a Friend

Limpkin

Limpkin

Sandhill Cranes

Sandhill Cranes

American White Ibises and a resting Wood Stork

American White Ibises and a resting Wood Stork

There have been a tremendous number of water birds, and wading birds here in my area in the last week.  I have seen several hundred Hooded Merganser ducks, about twenty-two or more Wood Storks, ten or so Great Blue Herons, probably thirty Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets,  Anhingas, Common Cormorants, White Pelicans (sorry no pictures as they left before I returned with the camera), a Tri-color Heron, hundreds of American White Ibises, a pair of Sandhill Cranes, Canada, Egyptian and Chinese Geese, Pied-billed Grebes,  Common Coots, and a Limpkin!

Such fun to watch all this action on a daily basis.  I took these pictures here in Sumter and Lake Counties in The Villages, Florida, in the past week.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the larger version of the picture.  Enjoy!

Tri-colored Heron

Tri-colored Heron

Grey Squirrel

Grey Squirrel

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

 

 

Osprey

Osprey

Wood Stork

Wood Stork

 

 

 

Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets

Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets

Canada Goose

Canada Goose

Pied-billed Grebe

Pied-billed Grebe

A Flock of Wood Storks!

 

DSC_8846

This Wood Stork flock is visiting a small local lake here in my area. I was amazed to see twenty-two Wood Storks along a short stretch of shoreline on Wednesday evening at twilight. This group of storks is a migratory flock. I have never seen so many Wood Storks at once. Wow!

The Wood Storks like eating small fish, aquatic snails, small turtles, frogs, tadpoles, large insects, small snakes, and other small animals that can be found in the shallows of lakes, ponds and rivers. The birds scoop up food with that sturdy big bill. These birds are found in Florida and in a few other tropical, mostly wild places in the United States. The Wood Storks just came off of the Endangered Species List and are still a Threatened Species here in the United States.

It is interesting to me to see how easily the Wood Storks and several other of the large wading birds, stand and hunt near houses and buildings in some places here in Florida. It seems like these birds adapt to their surroundings pretty well. It is important for people to remember not to feed exotic wild birds and to keep a good distance away (so as not to disturb the birds). There were some egrets also in the pictures and I saw many different kinds of ducks, geese and wading birds in the area.  Please click on the thumbnail images to see the larger picture. Enjoy!

DSC_9020DSC_8868DSC_8845

 

DSC_9012DSC_8960DSC_8897

Tag Cloud