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Posts tagged ‘Tennessee’

All Woodpeckers Today!

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Here are photographs of Woodpeckers that I took way back in 2011 when I lived at the lake house in Tennessee.  I hope you enjoy seeing the gorgeous birds!   Please click on the thumbnail image to see the larger photo of each woodpecker.  Wishing everyone a great Thanksgiving holiday!

Red-Headed Woodpecker

Northern Yellow-Shafted Flicker

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Northern Yellow-Shafted Flicker

Northern Yellow-Shafted Flicker

Downey Woodpecker

Downey Woodpecker

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My Lake House is For Sale

Hi All,  I am posting a link to the Knoxville Multiple Listing Service for my lake house in Fairfield Glade, Cumberland County, Tennessee.  My husband and I are selling this home at a very reasonable price!  I hope you’ll take a peek.  We really are hoping to sell this home soon.  If you have questions or want to tour the home, please contact our Agent.  Thanks!

http://public.kaarmls.com/property/view.asp?MLSID=828670&srURL=%2Fproperty%2FsearchResults%2Easp%3FAreaID%3D34%26pt%3D1%26K%5FBTH%3D3%26SubAreaID%3D347%26K%5FLP%5FMax%3D275000%26K%5FBR%3D4%26K%5FSQF%3D3000&

A Baltimore Oriole Bird Stops By

Yesterday I was out walking with the camera and saw a new face here.  I was extremely pleased to see a male Baltimore Oriole bird on a lower branch of a dead tree.  That tree is in a really good spot for the birds and wildlife – the gulch area near the pond’s dam.  Lots of food, water, and shelter.

The Baltimore Oriole is the bird of Maryland.  It is s Spring visitor here in this area of Tennessee up on the Cumberland Plateau.  The male is bright orange, black, and white.  The female and older juveniles are basically similar but of a duller and slightly brownish tone.  These birds love nectar, insects and fruits.  I have read where they really enjoy a now and then treat of a sliced orange fruit being put out for them to nibble at and sip the juices from.  Interesting!  I took the pictures in my driveway yesterday.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the larger photo.  Enjoy!

Drake Mallard Ducks

I was happy to see several drake Mallard Ducks here on the little pond this past week.  I took these pictures on April 15, 2012 and again on April 21, 2012 in my yard.  The drake or male Mallard Ducks have an emerald-green head, grayish-brown back, blue and white patches on the wings (especially seen when the duck is flying), orange feet, and a dark brown tail.  The bill is usually a greenish-yellow or also an orange-yellow in color.  They are quite social and tend to quack a lot at times.  They are larger than many other ducks.  There is a hen Ring-Necked Duck here that is infatuated with one of the drake Mallard Ducks.  They have both lived here for the past few months.  She had a Ring-Necked drake suitor who apparently did not stay with her.  She is in a couple of the pictures shown today.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the larger picture.  Enjoy!

A Coot Comes to Visit the Pond

I have never seen any coots here on the little farm pond before.  Yesterday afternoon I was exploring the far end of the property on the pond shoreline and saw a single American  Coot paddling around in the muddy reeds.  Coots are not ducks even though they look a lot like them.  The coots have a large white beak and also have toed feet with webbing like a duck.  A mixture of duck and chicken-like bird characteristics.  Coots are members of the Rail family of birds.  Coots are chicken or duck-sized birds.  They paddle on ponds, lakes and slow rivers, fly, and also stroll around on the shore.

I had a small flock of coots graze on my front lawn last year at the lake house.  Coots eat water plants, grasses, and grains.  They like to dive under the water to seek out tender aquatic plants for their meal.  They also dive to avoid predators.  Coots are themselves favored as a meal by Bald Eagles, Osprey, and most kinds of Hawks.  That is one reason why the Bald Eagles are in the Crossville, TN area during the winter months along larger lakes.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the larger photo.  Enjoy!

Bald Eagles at Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge

While we were at the State of Tennessee’s nice wildlife refuge at Hiwassee on 12/24/11, we saw three  eagles.  Two of these eagles were definitely Bald Eagles.   The other  eagle may have been a Golden Eagle or a juvenile Bald Eagle.  The eagles were  there because of the abundant waterfowl, fish in the lake, and huge numbers of cranes.  This is the Winter home for the Sand Hill and Whooping Cranes.  The Bald Eagles also hunt for small rodents in the forests and corn fields along the small lake.

The viewing platform was quite a ways away from the lake where the Bald Eagles flew.  We have Bald Eagles here in the Winter months in Eastern-Middle Tennessee.   Some pairs of eagles also live in the region all year around.   Both genders of Bald Eagles pretty much look the same.  The juvenile Bald Eagles are largely brown and black with touches of white.  Golden Eagles are brownish with golden highlights.  From a long distance, both the juvenile Bald Eagles and the Golden Eagles look very similar.   I get absolutely thrilled to see Bald Eagles and was overjoyed to also see the cranes!  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the larger picture.  Enjoy!

Red-Head Ducks Paddle By

A medium-sized flock of about twenty-five Red-Head Ducks came by the dock here on our 101 acre private community lake in Cumberland County, TN on Friday, March 11, 2011.  The Red-Head Ducks are migratory visitors that just stopped by on the way home.  The Red-Head Ducks mostly live in the West and North-western US.  The Red-Head Ducks are diving ducks.  These ducks sometimes will eat small aquatic animals, aquatic insects, but they mostly eat lake and stream weeds.  The Drake or male Red-Head Duck is the fellow with the very handsome red-head.  The female or hen, has a medium to dark brown body with lighter brown accent coloring.

I have read that the Red-Head female often borrows the nests of other species of ducks.  Sometimes the Red-Head hen will lay eggs in her own nest, sometimes she will lay her eggs in another’s nest and sit on the eggs until they hatch, and sometimes she will lay and leave.  The Red-Head Ducks do make good parents when they do choose to raise their own brood.  This parenting though, seems hit and miss with these ducks.  I was quite pleased to see the flock here.  They will likely be gone in a few days.   The Red-Head Ducks are very similar in looks to the Canvas-back Ducks.  A  couple of differences are the Red-Head Duck has a more round head and the canvas-back has a sloped forehead and slanted-look to its bill.  The Red-Head Ducks also have a blue-tinged bill.  In one of the pictures here (row 1 left side), a hen with a light ring of buff color above its bill, looks to be a Lesser Scaup Duck.  It must just be traveling with the big flock of its friends.  Please click on the thumbnail image to see the larger picture.  Enjoy!

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